Never Been Promoted

Charles Gellman: Unleashing Your Inner Entrepreneur

December 28, 2023 Thomas Helfrich Season 1 Episode 15
Never Been Promoted
Charles Gellman: Unleashing Your Inner Entrepreneur
Never Been Promoted
Support the Entrepreneurial Journey
Starting at $3/month
Support
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

If you're feeling frustrated and overwhelmed because your current strategies for growing your business aren't yielding the results you hoped for, then you are not alone! You may be tirelessly networking and cold-calling, only to be met with rejection and disinterest from potential clients. Instead of seeing your business flourish, you may find yourself stuck in a cycle of disappointment and stagnation. But there is hope and a way forward!

About Charles Gellman:
Charles Gellman, the CEO and co-founder of HiDOHealth, brings a wealth of experience in data science and a diverse background spanning finance, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and software. His entrepreneurial journey is a testament to perseverance and innovation. With a passion for leveraging technology to revolutionize the healthcare industry, Charles is at the forefront of developing AI-assisted robotic devices that aim to transform medication management. His expertise and insights into navigating the challenges of entrepreneurship and breaking new ground in healthcare technology make him an invaluable guest for anyone seeking inspiration and practical wisdom on their entrepreneurial journey.

In this episode, Thomas and Charles Gellman discuss how to:

  • Master your entrepreneurial journey and achieve growth through proven strategies.
  • Streamline medication management at home for improved health and peace of mind.
  • Uncover the importance of learning from past experiences for personal and professional growth.
  • Overcome the challenges faced by entrepreneurs with actionable insights and solutions.
  • Harness the power of CRM systems and business technology to elevate your company's success.

 Key Takeaways:

  • Master your entrepreneurial journey

Taking the plunge into entrepreneurship can be a daunting but rewarding experience. 

  • Streamline medication management at home

Innovation in technology can serve to greatly facilitate our daily lives. HiDOHealth’s automated medication management system, an initiative championed by Charles Gellman, is a prime example. 

  • Learn from past experiences

Learning and adapting from past endeavors is pivotal in guiding one's entrepreneurial journey, fostering resilience, and driving continued success.

“Persistence is the most important entrepreneurial trait. You have to be able to drive through no matter what people say because everybody is going to say or not. Everybody, the majority of the people will probably contradict what you're trying to do or accomplish." —  Charles Gellman

CONNECT WITH CHARLES GELLMAN:
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mshicgellman/
Website: https://us.hidohealth.com/ 

CONNECT WITH THOMAS:
X (Twitter)
Facebook
Website
Instagram
YouTube
LinkedIn
Email: t@instantlyrelevant.com

InstantlyRelevant.com
Serious about LinkedIn Lead Generation? Stop Guessing what to do on LinkedIn and ignite revenue from relevance with Instantly Relevant Lead System

Show notes by Podcastologist: Hanz Jimuel Alvarez

Audio production by Turnkey Podcast Productions. You're the expert. Your podcast will prove it.

Support the show
Speaker 1:

Welcome to the Never Been Promoted podcast with Thomas Hellfrey. Get ready for a thrilling adventure as we uncover entrepreneurial journeys and life-changing business insights every week. And now your host, Thomas.

Speaker 2:

Welcome to another episode of Never Been Promoted, where we help you unleash your entrepreneur. And we do this by learning from other entrepreneurs and their life stories and their entrepreneurial stories and hoping you know so you can learn from it and learn from their mistakes, with the things they wish they would have known, things they wish they wouldn't have done, etc. Today I'm joined by Charles Gellman. He is the CEO and co-founder of Heto Health. Charles, thank you so much for joining and thank you for coming on the show today.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, thank you so much for having me. I'm two cups of coffee in, so hopefully I'll stay awake during this.

Speaker 2:

Oh, you won't be boring, I won't let you sleep. I could do a little ASMR. Now, charles, tell me no, we won't do that. That's a different podcast maybe. But, charles, listen, I appreciate you joining. I think you joined from California, so it's not too early. But California is basically a different country, not from the United States. You would know that. But if you are from the United States, you do realize California is actually not part of the United States anymore. It's a new country, not true? All right, charles, I know you filled out lots of information for us before you got on the show. We talked before off camera, but I did that so you'd be prepared to just brag about yourself. So tell me a little bit about you, your company and a little bit about your background.

Speaker 3:

Yes, so thanks so much for having us on the show. My name is Charles Delman. I'm the co-founder and CEO of Idle Health. My background is in data science Before I started the journey of running through the medical arena. I started in finance, worked at a small bank called Wells Fargo and then, after a small stint within banking, I then ventured to pharmaceutical, medical device and software. So my journey has spanned far and wide, but I'm very excited. I talked to you a little bit about what we do today and I'll just tease it up right there.

Speaker 2:

Well, listen, I appreciate that. So the idea in this, as listeners who you listen to the show, I want to give advice through entrepreneurs' experience. So maybe start back and hit the salient points and the relevant ones specifically of your entrepreneurial journey and how you came here, because it may not be so. Everyone's story is a little different, so tell yours, yeah.

Speaker 3:

So I believe that you're able to connect the dots because of your experiences that took place. So, just like some of the things that you suggest in the show never been promoted, well, going through that journey, you're able to connect in specific insights and feedback because of your specific journey. So the culmination of my entrepreneurial experiences are because of the journeys and experiences and insights of people doing things great and doing things not so great within those specific tasks and then understanding those challenges and opportunities that present themselves and putting a plan of action into space. So I think most entrepreneurs have some perspective or insights that are unique and then they act upon them and do something about it.

Speaker 2:

It's a fantastic point and will you describe those? Also? A conscious knowing that you may not realize at the moment that you want to become an entrepreneur, but you're realizing on that path and you're describing there a very, very core piece is some of the unrest and happiness of being in an employment of others, but also where you find your strengths and what happens sometimes if those aren't enabled on your journey. You go, enable it yourself because that's where you're happy, that's what you're most passionate about, that's what you're most capable about, and if you feel restricted and you stay. You stay if you're not, and if you're not, you go on your own and in your own journey, having that hindsight, you look, you know, or that wisdom ahead of time to say, I think I want to be my entrepreneur but I don't know how. That's a great place to start. Where am I strong? What did I do bad and why? And where should I go with it? Where does that fit in the world of business? And it's complex, but I think that's one of the first steps in entrepreneurship. Is that your experience as well? Was it conscious, not conscious?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I think I mean I had this question asked to me or prompted the other day when we were part of a panel is that you know what prompted your entrepreneur journey? When did you know what age? And you know when I started it was very, very young. You know washing cars going. You know door to door, neighbor to neighbor, and then telling them of the value prop. You know you have a child knocking on your door trying to get you know somebody to buy some candy. But I think it's innate. You know, once you start that journey and you understand that you're going to get yeses and noes and it's okay to fail and you will succeed, but you'll fail more often than you do succeed. But knowing that you have that internal gut instinct that's guiding you for success, you have to be able to run through that and continue to persevere and drive through it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I don't look at failures and I will give you this advice to anyone and take it for what it's worth. Failure is nothing more than defining what you don't want to do, because there's nothing better than checking off the list of you know. I don't want to do that. Oh my gosh, I thought I did and I'll give you a prime example of my own. I went to law school for about a year or so and I was like I want to be a lawyer and after about a year of it, I'm like there's no way in hell I want to be a lawyer and I left. I got to pay back the JD thing without the JD, but the point being is it was a great decision that was really not as hard as I thought it would be to make, because it's a big thing. I checked off like there's no way in hell, I want to be a lawyer. Now, that's big. But think about that in small chunks as you kind of go through your journey in life is, you know, even today, at time, zero, right where you are, you make those decisions. So, uh, talked about the current adventure. Uh, you know, keto health, high to health, it's H-I-D-O. What's the right pronunciation? I see it, I see Hito.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so Hito, hito. I think it just depends upon the pronunciation of that person. If it's tomato or tomato or potato, it doesn't really matter. All that matters is that Hito helps people manage their medications in the comfort of their home. Our goal is to take care of the lost mile of hair. Amazon's done the last mile, but we want that lost mile. And what Hito does is it auto recognizes the right medication name, dosage, frequency. Within our patented technology, we have an embedded RFID chip in each pill bottle. So think of like a curing caulk machine with a hybrid of a ring and this is like a miniaturized brain within the device. So patients no longer are burdened with any of the medication protocols from the providers.

Speaker 2:

So for those just listening here, it's shown a device. Is it a physical device and is it? You know my health fear. I'm having a. It's not a senior moment, it's like a middle-aged moment. Those connected devices for remote access, is that what that is? It's an actual physical device, yeah, so what? What's the bottle's in?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so Hito is a AI-assisted robotic device. It looks like a coffee machine we did that by design and then you put your pill bottles in the back of the unit and the unit auto recognizes all of the information that you forgot from your doctor's visit within each pill bottle, so you no longer have to worry about remembering what did we talk about Wow.

Speaker 2:

So I have questions now. Does it recognize it, the pill bottle or the pill itself?

Speaker 3:

So it's the pill bottle itself and the bottle the pill bottle, and then it dispenses the right medication, the right time, the right frequency, the right dosage for the right person.

Speaker 2:

Okay. Question C Niogranplot takes medication X, dumps it out. Also dumps down medication Y. Refills the wrong bottle. Mm-hmm, where does your thing fit on that one?

Speaker 3:

Well, what happens if C Niogranplot cannot pour out all the pills? And what if you actually had a documented record, dose by dose, time-stamped with recording, so Grampot no longer overdoses or underdoses or mixes medication?

Speaker 2:

Well, that's what I'm saying what happens if you mix medication so it doesn't look at it as a pill. Like that pill should be yellow, according to the thing to that bottle it just takes. It reads I'm just interested because I'm like I see totally the benefit. I can go to my parents' house and be like good word. This is like you know, going to the yogurt store and trying to pick your toppings. They're pills. I'm like, how do you keep it together? Well, one of them, who's less senile than the other, puts it together, and so your thing's putting together the buffet for them for the day. And as your technology evolves, you'll put more and more checks in to make sure that if pills got in the wrong bottles, you know the something looks counterfeit, whatever it is. That's where you guys are headed from your vision.

Speaker 3:

I'll hold something up for the people on video. So this is a pill bottle. If you look inside the pill cap, everything is sized for each pill. So each pill has a specific cap and it's uniquely identified by each cap. So when you get your medications, whether it's from a mail order pharmacy or if you go to a retail pharmacy, it's usually in a different size pill bottle depending upon the size and the shape of the pill itself. Never noticed.

Speaker 2:

I don't take pills. I have no medication whatsoever, not even alcohol anymore Never prescribed, just be clear. All right, this is amazing. I love this kind of tech and your entrepreneurial journey. Right, let's dive into it. So one of the first, the biggest things I look for, or when I work with entrepreneurs, is they ask, kind of like they're a thing they're worried about how do they get their first customer? And maybe you have to set this up a little bit with we come from this industry or this and that, and you have a co-founder, so you have a team. Talk about how you got your first customer.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that's a great question. So first you know, you try to determine which verticals that you want to go after. And just because you go after and it seems like it's a great fit doesn't mean that that will be your first customer. So I first started looking at the pharmaceutical marketplace clinical research organizations, pre-covid, providing data integrity to an industry where you know, dose by dose, whether or not medications had safety and efficacy. Thanks, surprise.

Speaker 2:

You're right about something there. So I think the takeaway from that is and I know from my own experience I'll explain this but where you think you need to, where it'd be a great fit, may not be a great fit for where you are in your journey yet. So, oh, you know, we're gonna sell the hospitals. We're gonna because we certainly the use case is there, but you don't have the MSA, the insurance the size to sell to them. Yet. So your first customer might be someone who sells into a hospital or even or an independent, and so you may have to use someone else's partnering method to get there. I know from our own experience that it's really relevant. Our first market was coaches on LinkedIn. Because they're selling on LinkedIn, we're trying to help them become relevant. What I found was we didn't have the right level of support and services. It turns out it's absolutely the right market, but I couldn't sell to them because we weren't set up to deliver for them because of what they needed. And so a few years later we're like it seems like a simple thing we absolutely kill it for coaches now because of that reason. So that's a smaller scale, but giving you the bigger scale of being healthcare medical. You know there's a lot of stuff to get there. I think that's a good point and maybe you guys can talk through of hey, we know we wanna sell to the Blues. We know, knowing hell, we're gonna get to sell the Blues the next three years, five years, until we have these approvals. Was that part of your conscious strategy of we need that's the end goal. We know that's who's gonna benefit. Is there members or whatever else benefit Is that? First of all, is that valid? And second, what did you guys do about it?

Speaker 3:

So the first thing that you try to go is path of least resistance to show traction within the workplace. So then you have, you know investors come in and then they can see the traction of milestones that you hit. But as much as I thought that that would be our primary go to market strategy, it wasn't, and that's okay, because there was another eye point and you actually tease this perfectly for me is that you start talking about how well Health Plan there's really the pinnacle of them. Now you know, if we could hit Health Plans and prove this thing out, then it's absolutely game over. But that's exactly what happened. We had an advisor who was a former CEO of a Health Plan that we were able to get in. We were able to validate a substantial reduction of hospitalizations of 80% and a cost of care decrease of 70% for folks that have heart failure. So sometimes you know your greatest milestone is possible. You just don't know it at that time. So you're looking at different verticals in the market. You just don't know which one's gonna hit first. But you gotta be able to go out, put yourself on a limb and see which one will hit. And then now you know and this is I don't know how ironic this is. Now my initial go to market strategy is actually coming to fruition. You know, just like your story. So you just don't know until you know.

Speaker 2:

Wait well, and so I think that's a good validation. So a smaller version being like individuals, let's say, on a social media platform, for some entrepreneurs out there, others being I got a big idea. Both paths are similar because you're seeing where you need to go. What I think we're a lot of entrepreneurs fall down is you're seeing a straight line at the top. I'm gonna you know, and I know there are pitfalls, fires. You're gonna fall down the mountain a few hundred times, you're gonna get hit by rocks and you're like to get up. The mountain is not gonna just be an easy cakewalk. If it is, you're called a unicorn and you're one of a million companies that get that status to do that. So even then, they have their own thing. So, 100% agreed, your strategy might be initially right, but I think it talks to the bigger thing is don't put the blinders on. And another thing is get on your bike and ride. So the analogy being, if you try to stand, get on a bike and don't move, you fall over and you don't go anywhere. If you get on a bike and ride, it's easier to steer, navigate and get going somewhere, and it's even easier to turn around if you needed to. So get moving. Let's pivot just a little bit. I wanna get into kind of your take on entrepreneurship. You're a CEO of a company. You could talk about the funding if you want, but you guys are sizable and you're and I know you as the CEO you're like, well, not yet we wanna get, but you're getting there. You're in an envious place of many founders. Talk about your own journey, like maybe you know what's the one thing, one thing you wish you would have known before just becoming an entrepreneur.

Speaker 3:

Well, there's a lot of things that I wish you would have known, but sometimes ignorance is bliss and I don't know if I would really wanna know the amount of pain and a heartache and obstacles and challenges that you go through on a daily basis, because that might be a big deterrent. The way I see it is that I like to have that intellectual curiosity and continue to go after different obstacles and challenges on a daily, and I like my days to be different, so that is something that really piques my interest. So I don't think I would wanna know, because if you knew the path in the past, you wouldn't be happy with the obstacles and challenges that you overcome in the future. And then you can reflect upon wow, we've done some pretty amazing things. I would have never thought if I told you we would be doing research at Stanford, doing research at Rush University with dementia patients and these people are being successful. A lot of the milestones and the team that we built to produce a product that never was in existence it came from pen and paper to where we're at right now. It's like if you would have told me that this was possible, I would have told you first off. You're crazy, and I'm crazy to even believe you that this is even possible, great point.

Speaker 2:

So ignorance is bliss. But if you wanna know kind of how you feel, that's what my book's about. It's the emotional kind of like ride that you're gonna go through and all the things that'll help you navigate that better. Specifically, you nailed it Just know a run-relenting belief in yourself that you know. You just don't know, but you know you're gonna need to head that way and just be ready. You can't be ready for anything but accept whatever comes and just how you react to it and how that's what's gonna define your character, your company and your success is nothing stops you. You may get knocked back, you may have to get repaired, but you are not doing anything. That's moving forward. So the fantastic thing is accept ignorance and accept that that's part of the journey. Anyway, now you're ignorant to what's gonna happen in the future. You can still think you know you're going, but you're gonna be like I would never have guessed we IPO'd for six trillion. I'm like you never know, right, I would never guess a Pfizer bought me and I have a $400 million check in my account. Like that one you might actually.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I think every entrepreneur needs to trust their gut instinct, but we are the culmination of the people that we're surrounded by, so it's your advisors, it's your investors, it's your team, it's the personality and the culture that has been created through the company. And then also, the most important thing for us is the patience. You know, the patients are the ones that drive the feedback, the insights, the development, and taking in all those communications really is the aggregate of what the company is today and that lives and breathes and changes on a daily basis based upon the needs of the people that we're serving.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I have a chapter of a book and I think it's called like the Customer of Voice is in Perfect Tune, and so if you listen to that, you have all the music you need to write your symphony. And so the truth is, listen to them, really listen to them, don't just hear them like. Listen to what they're saying and digest it of what their actual pains and wants and needs are, and don't guess. So I think you're spot on. What's one thing maybe you would not have done or along that journey?

Speaker 3:

Well, I believe that everybody can learn from their mistakes and those obstacles and challenges. So there's nothing that I would have changed, because that was part of the history of what we are today, so I wouldn't have avoided things. There's specific items that I believe you spend time on that you wish you didn't spend as much time, but we're pretty quick about making decisions and then altering the path. You're not gonna be doing a full 180, but you'll make slight adjustments to your strategy. But you should know going in or at least from my perspective what verticals you're attacking, who you're listening to, why you're listening to, and just because people provide advice, you have to delineate what's important, what's not, and that's just the experience of an entrepreneur.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I mean any regrets on that journey at all.

Speaker 3:

No, I mean the way that we've done stuff. We have gone through development and planning and strategy and execution with a very mindful state. We discuss things as a team and I take into account everyone's opinion and then make a final call. But I'm very grateful for the people that we have supported us.

Speaker 2:

And I think a regret you could have made was to do it alone, and it sounds like you put a team together and that would have been a big mistake, and I'm sure even with your head it's like I can do this. Let me talk about that, because I think that's a pitfall people do. I've fallen into it. I got a team, though, very quickly, but the question is, you have a team around, you talk away to the pitfall of doing it.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so great insight. So I had to start up before we started this. It was a company where I was a sole entrepreneur CEO and I had a couple of contractors on the side. I bootstrapped it. I did not raise money. That was a great error on my part because I was competing against a team of 50 people that had about $25 million VC money. Eventually I got to a point where I was about to land a multi-million dollar deal and they gave their products away for free. So sometimes in life you quickly realize that there's a reason why people have a large team or they have a large arsenal of capital so they can deploy and grow based upon their strategy and crush the competition. So a lot of these things kind of are imprinted in your brain as you move along the entrepreneurial experience.

Speaker 2:

Just from your story there, the company that gave away for free. If you were about to get a multimillion dollar deal, I think they should have gotten a $100,000 deal. That sounds like they still shouldn't have given away for free. Anyway, sounds like that for a company, but the point being is, effectively it's free when they would have paid this. So that's, I mean, that's not a regret, but it's a learning. Try not to go at it alone. You may have to be. You'll do a lot of the work as an entrepreneur and as a leader of it, as a founder, even a co-founder. That's different than doing it alone, and so just don't expect. Don't expect all the growth and things you want if you're and it's okay to go alone, but don't expect to be bigger than you can be yourself if you don't have a team. Be on a team like partners, actually people you work with In your own kind of in your current company. Was there a pivotal moment that either saved the company, turned it around or blessed it with just like just the opportunities, like a key, pivotal moment?

Speaker 3:

One of the key pivotal moments I've had and I've been very successful at getting some fantastic advisors on our team. But one of the advisors that we landed very, very early and we our demo was pretty rough was the former chief health plan administrator for CalPERS. So Dr Donison ran a $10 billion a year health plan when we started with a shell of what we are today and she believed in what we were doing because throughout her entire career she was looking for an answer and we happened to hit that exact moment in time where we were able to get her in and she was supporting us to introduce us to CEOs throughout California. So that was a key moment in the success or stabilization up high to now take us to where we were, to now share our story with all the powerful people that run these health plans.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely, and I think you touched on me. My last question of kind of going to the hot seat here a little bit, just but and how you're preparing for the future, and what I'm saying about that is, you know it's, this is really around mentoring, coaching and advisement and it sounds like you're on that. But how are you guys preparing? Are you personally preparing as an entrepreneur for the future and that could go beyond the exit or that could go but how are you doing it as an entrepreneur?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so I have reached out to folks that I believe are the best and the brightest within the industry, and some of the people are formally recognized as advisors and more often than not they are not. So our net is folks that have been working with the pharmaceutical industry, political research organizations, health plans, finance bankers. You know it's really an aggregation of people within the industry supporting what we're doing because they want it to be successful. So I, on an ongoing basis, reach out to people because I value their feedback, even though they're not a formal team.

Speaker 2:

Member of HIDO. Yeah, and this is. I always ask this question because I want everyone who's an entrepreneur and it just in life. You're always at time zero and you're always backed. What you just talked about, what you want to learn about, what you credit about. So what are you doing about it now? And getting a mentor, getting an advisor, getting some type of coach in your life that's ahead of you as a perspective, as a network that can help you, enable it is, is absolutely you need to prepare for the future. I myself, right now, I'm like kind of mentorless right now. I've had one kind of in my later and I was like their day thinking like who's that going to be? And so I'm kind of actually looking through my connections of who would be a good mentor for me and I'm coming up a little blank. I have some of myself with peer to peers, with some of my customers that I've developed the relationship with, but I'm also careful that you know they're paying us to deliver services but they're also giving me advice from their perspective and I give them. So it's interesting how that happens and my advice to an entrepreneur listening is seek mentorship in the forms that best serve you either be emotionally or just for business or whatever it is, but definitely prepare yourself because you'll be in a better spot there to grow and interact and continually get better. Now you guys didn't sponsor this, but if you had, what would you guys say during a sponsorship bit for a shameless plug right now?

Speaker 3:

Please visit hydrohealthcom and learn more information about AI system robotics. You know, if you are in charge of a health plan or a pharmaceutical company and want to utilize new robotic technology to get medications to the patients and record them dose by dose, please reach out to us.

Speaker 2:

That's hydrohealth, h-i-d-o Health. If you can't spell health, go to dictionarycom. All right, here we go. Sorry, how to do it? If you don't have humor in your life, you don't belong listening to this podcast. Let's put that All right, hot seat. I asked these questions specifically just to kind of learn what you're working on, but also to collect data so I can seek sponsorship. All right, here we go Now. Are you ready?

Speaker 3:

first of all, I will do my best. I'm never ready, but I am here in the moment.

Speaker 2:

That's good, and if you don't know the answer, I'll answer it for you. So favorite calendar-skill scheduling technology.

Speaker 3:

I've used a lot in my corporate world as well as startup, but I do not have a favorite. We do use Zoho right now, but I've used Salesforce Siebel I think every single CRM that exists in the business. They're very similar in nature, but no specific one.

Speaker 2:

Well, yeah, I think you've answered my second question, which is your favorite CRM. So you're using your CRM in conjunction with scheduling as opposed to, let's say, like a Calendly and then HubSpot or Zoho, so you're putting all in one.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, we use Gmail, I mean for a lot of our calendar stuff. But there's integrations to all the different CRMs. It just depends upon your preference and what you're looking to do from a customer's patient standpoint.

Speaker 2:

I like that. So the phone entrepreneur-altered tip if you can combine technologies to have one less, do it. If you find the Zoho is good or Pike driver is a HubSpot and you're using their scheduling technology, it integrates in a little bit better to work to kind of keep it all together one spot. So the bigger the technology have. As you know, you got to line up resources to it to run it or it becomes not as useful. So very good. So Zoho for that. What's your favorite business?

Speaker 3:

book, Great question. So we were talking about mentorship and there's an investor that I really, really respect and he sent me this book called Bill, Tony Fadel.

Speaker 2:

So you saw another book called Bill that looks like White Label, Tony Fadel. So this is for those listening and not watching, Tony.

Speaker 3:

Fadel. So what's it about? So it's actually about what we just chatted about. Is it going through those trials and tribulations of starting something, then pivoting in small deviations, but being very mindful of what you're doing and why you're doing it, which is mission critical. If you're doing it for you, you're probably not going to be successful, but if you're doing it for the people around you and you're supporting others, then things tend to shape themselves because you're listening to the community.

Speaker 2:

No, you're spot on. So in our own systems that we leverage with our customers, the fundamental thing is the answer, or the question of why? Why are they a customer? Why would you say this? What does that? Why does that add value? And, in particular, when you do these, any system like what I mean by that, I mean like technology, but somewhere you're interacting with your customer and your operations. Not doing it for yourself is a really good answer and the answer being I do it for the customers. It's okay to be. I want to be more efficient. That benefits me, but why? So I can have more time to serve the customers Like so I have the why of why you want to do something for yourself, as long as it always ties back to the benefit of who you're trying to sell or service. So I love that answer and I think the person up and coming and following is it Tony that you would say recommend follow his stuff on LinkedIn.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I mean, I think that there's a number of people. But you know, I've been reading a lot of behavioral psychology because of the dementia research that we've been doing, but those are mostly critical things. But from a business standpoint, yeah, I think you should. You know, go follow stuff and take a look at some of his ideas and strategies. Wonderful, thank you. What's your favorite bank? Well, we've been courted by a few of them. I can't put any of them out there right now, but we do bank with a very large one. There's a number of other ones that have been very supportive. And your negotiations, I get it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah let's see how those go in the future. So where are you guys? Just maybe set the stage. Where are you as far as fundraising Like Series A, B, C, C?

Speaker 3:

We're CriSeriesA right now. We have a lead investor out of Seattle, a fantastic individual, and he's leading the round and after our CriSeriesA, which is a little bit more than a million dollars, million and a half, we'll probably do a Series A later next year, depending upon where we're at anywhere like 10 to 20 million or inch.

Speaker 2:

So that is a great anatomy out of Seattle. Just kidding. Oh listen, I'm 18 years into this, watched my wife at this point. I feel all the part of the show. The bank, then the idea is that you find a bank that serves the need of your business. I think it's what you're communicating there and you don't know this. Entrepreneurs, when you get to some size, even small, you can negotiate with better. There's different banks for different people and there's different stages. So it definitely takes some time to do some research. We'll come back in a later interview when you raise the money of what the bank is. All right, here's the second to last question what is the most important entrepreneurial trait?

Speaker 3:

Great question. From my perspective, it's persistence. You have to be able to drive through, no matter what people say, because everybody is going to say or not everybody the majority of the people will probably contradict what you're trying to do or an accomplishment. And if you have the will and the perseverance to overcome the naysayers and overcome all of the obstacles and challenges that will be in your path which there are a ton then you have the chance to be successful.

Speaker 2:

So this is your first time listening to a podcast of ours. That is the number one answer. But persistence, resilience, for sure. I'll probably do a post on this, because I tell this to my kids all the time. I'm like are you from Planet Yabba? Yeah, but yeah, you can meet people who are yeah, but there's no, and yeses, there's no plan, and yes, apparently except me, and yes, and you know so. So Planet Yabba, people stay there, okay, all right. Last question it's a big one, I mean, this is an important one here. Bring it home, okay.

Speaker 3:

I have once and that was while I was working as a bank other positions. I actually left those positions to promote myself. So I think it depends upon your outlook and where you're going and what you want to do in life and what your skill centers are. But there is a lot of folks that jump different roles in different companies to promote themselves.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely so. I'm on the same path. I'm going to semi-include you in the club. We'll call it a honor a member of the Never Been Promoted Club, because you said you kind of had one. I'm going to say it's probably a long time ago, by own journey, by the way, I looked at promotions as I could go. Maybe make five to 10% more in internal promotion. Or you can do the following math make 20%, 30%, 40%, double, and I don't care what number you start with. That gets bigger, faster. What happens in your 40s? By the way, if you're on this path, you're on the entrepreneurial path because you'll become unhierable, because your resume will look terrible, obviously not speaking from this experience, just talking about a friend of mine who wrote a book named me All right, lack, listen. So much thanks to you In the time. I know you're busy. Every entrepreneur I meet the fact that they take 30 minutes hour, whatever all their data. Just thank you, charles, so much for coming on the show today.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate it. I wish your audience the best in their entrepreneurs. I'm Jardys.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely, and listen. I'll leave you with the floor before I give me a couple of closing things. How do you want people to get personally a hold of you or your? I don't know if you guys have special offers or you want to try it, but talk to me about how people get a hold of you and what's your call to action. What do you want people to go do? Who are listening to this?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so we have plenty of videos on our website. Go to Hytohealth, HIDO Health. If you need help with that later part, then go ahead and resource your dictionary. But plenty of videos share the word like comment. We have posts going on all the time on LinkedIn and YouTube, so just learn more about what we're doing.

Speaker 2:

Wonderful Hytohealthcom. Charles. Thank you so much. Everybody who's listening never been promoted. I hope you go out and unleash your entrepreneur, Learn from others. It's something I wish I would have done better, and I'm here as a resource, and the people who take the time to come on the show learn from them. They are down a path and there's something always to be learned from any entrepreneur who's at any level of success or failure. So thank you so much for listening and once again to the Never Been Promoted podcast.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for listening to Never Been Promoted with Thomas Hellfrey. Make sure to check the show notes for our guest contact information and any relevant links. Connect with Thomas personally at NeverBenPromotedcom.

Entrepreneurship and Innovative Medication Management
Lessons and Insights on Entrepreneurship
Seeking Mentorship and Favorite Business Tools
Learn From Successful Entrepreneurs With Hellfrey